Hubble spots ‘smiling face’ among group of newborn stars

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In a new image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, the stars have aligned to give us just that.

In an image posted to NASA's website, two yellow orbs could be seen above an arc of light, painting a smiley face in the middle of a sea of stars. This effect is known as gravitational lensing and requires that the three participants (the light source, the massive structure, and the observer - which is on Earth) be aligned in a straight-line configuration called a syzygy.

Recently, using the data collected by Hubble and Kepler telescope, a team of researchers at the Columbia University found the evidence of the first moon outside the solar system.

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"The lower, arc-shaped galaxy has the characteristic shape of a galaxy that has been gravitationally lensed - its light has passed near a massive object en route to us, causing it to become distorted and stretched out of shape", said NASA.

NASA hopes to analyze the luminosity, the size, and the rate of formation of stars in different stellar nurseries from various points in time throughout the universe.

Far away galaxies smiling back at Hubble. Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 is capable of seeing distant galaxies in unparalleled resolution, yet, high enough to locate and study regions where new stars are forming. What you're looking at is dozens of distant galaxies with countless stars being born and dying. It's important to study stellar formation within different galaxies to gain a richer context, which is why Hubble had its gaze fixed on a galaxy cluster. With years of experience, she is able to spot the most interesting new achievements of scientists around the world and cover them in easy to understand reporting.

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