Trump Says 5 'Most Wanted' ISIS Leaders Captured

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According to the New York Times, the militants were caught by the Iraqi military in cooperation with the American intelligence operation in Syria and Turkey.

The leaders were taken in Iraq after months of strategic planning by the USA, including the CIA, Turkey and Iraqi forces.

Iraq called the captured commanders of the Islamic state "one of the most wanted" leaders of the organization.

A US national security official said there were no indications that the operation had captured Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of IS who has always been the coalition's top target.

Their arrest represented the two highest-ranking ISIS jihadists ever to be captured alive.

Iraq had described the capture of the Islamic State commanders as "some of the most wanted" leaders of the group.

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Reuters admits that, probably talking about the capture of Iraq's five senior commanders of the IG.

Following the airstrike, the paper reports, US and Iraqi agents persuaded al-Ithawi to help set a trap and convince the other ISIS leaders to leave Syria and enter Iraq.

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi said last month he would "take all necessary measures" against militants based in Syria.

A top aide to the Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al- Baghdadi, had been in charge of fatwas, or religious rulings, in the Islamic State's so-called caliphate.

President Donald Trump on Thursday hailed the fact that five of the "most wanted" Islamic State leaders have been captured recently, including Abu Zeid al-Iraqi, one of the main collaborators of the organisation's chief, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

Although Baghdad declared victory over ISIS in December 2017, Iraqi and American officials concede that the jihadist group still poses a threat.

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